ICRPG Stress/Sanity: Take 2

The rough draft was a little far afield of the core ICRPG mechanics; it works great as a direct port, but it’s not ICRPG.

So, take 2:

  1. When you take stress, roll vs WIS (base difficulty 12)
  2. if you fail, you take all stress inflicted by the attack.
  3. If you succeed, roll d10 effort. Final “stress damage” is attack – effort.

Loot and other factors may protect against stress, offering a higher effort die.

The 0-100/101-200 scale and rules remain the same as before.

think that fixes the basic mechanic to be closer to ICRPG than before, while retaining the same kind of “attack/resist” system.

ICRPG Sanity Rules (rough draft)

By way of Darkest Dungeon, I drafted out an idea for Sanity rules for ICRPG.

Sanity (aka stress) is a “double scale”, from 0-100 and 101-200. The first segment is “temporary” and the second is “permanent”.

Every time you accumulate stress – even a single point – you roll d%. You want to roll over the new value if your stress scale (meaning, if you have a stress of 25, and you gain 10, you want to roll 35 or higher).

Success means you’re OK; nothing happens. Failure means you gain an affliction. Make a note at which score you gained the affliction; you might want to note it something like “(52) Hydrophobia”.

When your stress goes over 100, things change slight. You still roll to gain afflictions against d% (but on a 1-100 scale, eg stress of 125 equals a target of 25). You do not need to remember the score, though; you can note them something like “(permanent) fear of breakfast”.

Afflictions gained above 100 are permanent. Lowering your stress does not make them go away. At 100 or less, any afflictions are temporary and as soon as your stress level goes under the level at which an affliction was added, it goes away.

You may reduce stress by plain ol’ rest, prayer, carousing or other vices, or some other activity (noted on your character sheet). Rest removes d4 per week, more advanced methods d6. Advanced stress methods may also require coin; if visiting the brothel helps, you gotta pay. You cannot use ALL methods of stress relief; you must chose vice or virtue. Those choosing vice cannot pray to remove stress; those choosing virtue cannot engage in pleasures of the flesh to remove stress. Other methods (eg loot) exist to remove stress and restore sanity.

(You don’t have to pick virtue or vice ahead of time, but once you pick, you’re committed!)

As above, anything gained as permanent cannot be removed through regular methods. It requires loot, coin, or something special to remove afflictions gained as a result of permanent stress.

If your stress level hits 200, you die or go irrevocably insane; your choice.

TODO: List of afflictions.

ICRPG: nearly perfect

So I picked up ICRPG a while ago, but haven’t had the time to really sit down and digest it. I’m pretty peeved I didn’t, because it’s amazing.

ICRPG can be thought of as 3 things:

  1. a broad methodology for tabletop gaming (“the index card method”)
  2. a set of rules, suited to but not required for, the above
  3. a bunch of actual gaming (tabletop and online) assets for #1

The rules itself are solid: a roll-over, d20, bonus-based minimalist system. If you’re used to a system like 5E or Pathfinder, you’re going to be a little lost – ICRPG has very little in terms of rules, preferring to let the basic mechanics and group decisions drive everything.

It also assumes you have a fair amount of existing material to adapt; there are plenty of good spell lists in 5E, after all.

Players/groups who expect great detail are going to be disappointed: there’s a basic “everything does the same damage” system, for example (shared by the brilliant WFRP). I consider it a feature, but some will see a bug.

The “index card method” is another great idea. In brief, it tries to bridge the gap between highly detailed tactical play and purely abstract theatre-of-the-mind. In my opinion it succeeds perfectly. Perfect foot-by-foot maneuvering and range calculation slows down gameplay in any group that’s not already committed to wargaming.

You can break down a large area into “sectors”, you can represent groups occupying said sectors, and still have “champions” and individuals occupying space. It works really well!

The art design and quality of the materials is excellent. I can see the argument that the art style may not be your thing – it’s kind of abstract – but I dig it and I think it’s really, really good value for the money. (If you want extremely detailed and specifically designed art, it’s going to cost you!)

Anyway, it’s really good and worth a look, especially at the price. http://www.runehammergames.com/index.html