The lock-in we choose

Hackernews had a link to a piece about someone moving to a password locker called Bitwarden.

It’s interesting because it illustrates the weird state we’re in with platforms today.

First, this bit:

Meanwhile, AgileBits, the 80-person company developing 1Password, has been pushing their new hosted, subscription-based model for 1Password going forward. Instead of users being in control of their data files, 1Password will store them on AgileBits’ servers and users pay a monthly subscription fee for the privilege, forever.

I fail to see how the staff size of AgileBits has anything to do with anything. It feels ad-hom; how DARE they not be a scrappy little 2-man startup! How dare they have a support staff, enough junior sysadmins to have 24/7 coverage for their new web service, a full-time graphics and design team to cover all the platforms they support, and whatever else it takes to run their company the way their principals want.

Anyway, yes, the subscription-and-stored-on-our-servers model was, and is, very concerning. I am still using iCloud sync, because it has worked very well for me and I did not want to be an early adopter of stuff with my passwords.

What gets me, though, is this:

… there is an issue of lock-in and now having to make my OpenBSD hacks work …

My dude.

AgileBits was, as I recall, founded as a company whose primary platform was the Mac. They don’t even mention Knox or other apps anymore. For a long time, even Android was a second-class citizen; I haven’t used Android in a while but when I last did, it didn’t even have proper 1Password support; it had some read-only nonsense.

Think about that: Android installs outnumber iPhone by rather a large margin and they didn’t bother with it.

In short, my dude, you chose to drive a car that needs leaded gas and you’re mad Pep Boys isn’t going to sell you the right additive.

They are a Mac software company, who also makes a port to Windows; they are an iPhone app company who ported their app to Android. They give 0 fucks about OpenBSD on the desktop, because supporting all 9 OpenBSD desktop users will not help pay their mortgages.

The point, here, is that we all chose a kind of lock-in. Every choice we make in software and hardware platforms ties us to an ecosystem. There is this pervasive myth that F/OSS will free us from lock-in.

Bullshit. It frees us from the woes of decisions made in boardrooms based on spreadsheet calculations for 3 fiscal quarters from now; but it locks us into the whims of hobby projects, volunteer support, trends, and more. Just about everyone in a Mac uses 1Password, but with my office as a small sample set (plus the Hackernews comment section) all the F/OSS community gets is the paradox of choice.

 

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